Assumption of the Virgin Mary
Ukrainian Orthodox Church
1301 Newport Avenue, Northampton, PA
Assumption of the Virgin Mary Ukrainian Orthodox Church Online

"We are obliged to direct that all our churches are now closed for public worship for the duration of this threat to all of us."

Please READ the LATEST Directives (04/02/20) HERE.

Click HERE to read the entire URGENT message from our Heirarchs regarding the pandemic crisis.

Click HERE for Prayer in Time of Corona Virus

Are you at home trying to find ways to stay focused and faithful? If so, enter the 2020 UOL Essay contest (for all ages, Pre-K to Adults)! Click HERE to see the details.

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Welcome to the Assumption of the Virgin Mary Ukrainian Orthodox Church!

We are a parish of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the USA under the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople and our doors and hearts are open to you and your family!  Our church follows the Julian (Old) Calendar. All Orthodox Christians are welcome and encouraged to participate in the Blessed Sacraments of Repentance and Eucharist.  See the bulletin tab for all liturgical information regarding feasts and commemorations.

Do you love God and desire a deeper union in Him through Christ?  Are you moved by the beauty of traditional architecture, iconography, and liturgy?  Do you love to experience warm, family-friendly fellowship, to hear good music and Christ-centered preaching, to participate in enriching adult education and to offer the same to your children?  If so, then "Come and See" us!  It would be a blessing if you could visit us and we encourage you to come back as often as you can.  Perhaps you will find our parish to be your spiritual home!

We are located at 1301 Newport Avenue in Northampton, Pennsylvania.

Visit the 360° Virtual Tour of our church by opening the "360 Virtual Tour" page.  It is a fully immersive, sharable virtual reality tour of our church building. Enjoy  a glimpse of the beauty and majesty within our church.

Greeters for the month:  Margaret Leindecker, John Hnatow, Karen Osmun, Alex Semenovych, Lesya Semenovych, Mike Hnatow

Still Important, but not NEW:

  • Meatfare Sunday in our Church and Zapusty (EVENTS)
  • Justin & Sabrina place in 2019 Essay Contest (OUR CHURCH FAMILY) See link above for 2020 rules
  • Congratulations to Rev. Fr. Oleg!!! 🎓🎓🎓 for receiving his Masters of Divinity from St Sophia's Seminary (PHOTOS)
  • Baptism and Chrismation of Fr Oleg and Pani Olha's daughter Elizabeth (PHOTOS)
  • Scroll to the bottom of the liturgical calendar to access the  CATECHETICAL HOMILY AT THE OPENING OF HOLY AND GREAT LENT

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DAILY LITURGICAL CALENDAR,  SCRIPTURE READINGS AND MENAION

Sun. 5 Apr. Fast Day: Wine & oil – Fifth Sunday of the Great Lent. Tone 1
Venerable Mary of Egypt. Monk-martyr Nicon and 199 disciples, in Sicily (251). Martyrs Philetas the Senator, his wife Lydia, their sons Macedon and Theoprepius, the notary Cronides, and Amphilochius the Captain, in Illyria (12 5). Ven. Nicon, abbot of the Kyiv Caves (1088).
Heb. 9:11-14 Mk. 10:32-45
8:30 AM Third & Sixth Hours
9:00 AM Divine Liturgy Of Basil The Great

For Sixth Week Of The Great Fast

Mon. 6 Apr. Fast Day – Forefeast of the Annunciation. Ven. Zacharias the Recluse of Egypt (4th c.). St. Artemon, bishop of Seleucia (1st c.). Ven. James the Confessor, bishop of Catania (811). Ven. Zachariah, faster of the Kyiv Caves (13th c.).
Is. 48:17–49:4 Gen. 27:1-41 Prov. 19:16-25
Gen. 28:10-17 Ezek. 43:27-44:4 Prov. 9:1-11

Tue. 7 Apr. - THE ANNUNCIATION OF THE THEOTOKOS. Martyrs Pelagia, Theodosia, and Dula of Nicomedia.
Lk.1:39-49, 56 Is. 49:6-10 Gen. 31:3-16 Prov. 21:3-21
Ex. 3:1-8 Prov. 8:22–30 Heb. 2:11-18 Lk. 1:24-38


Wed. 8 Apr. Fast Day – Leave-taking of the Annunciation. Synaxis of the Archangel Gabriel. Hieromartyr Irenaeus, bishop of Srem (Sirmium), Serbia (304). Martyrs Bathusius and Bercus presbyters, monk Arpilus, laymen Abibus, Agnus, Reasus and others (375). St. Malchus of Chalcis in Syria (4th c.). St. Basil the Younger, anchorite near Constantinople (944).
Is. 58:1-11 Gen. 43:26-31; 44:1-16 Prov. 21:23–22:4


Thu. 9 Apr. Fast Day – St. Matrona of Thessalonica (4th c.). Martyrs Manuel and Theodosius (304). St. John the Clairvoyant of Lycopolis, anchorite of Egypt (394).
Is. 65:8-16 Gen. 46:1-7 Prov. 23:15-24:5


Fri. 10 Apr. Fast Day – St. Hilarion the New, abbot of Pelecete (754). St. Stephen the Wonderworker, abbot of Tryglia (815). Martyrs Jonah and Barachisius and those with them in Persia (330). Martyr Eustratius of the Kyiv Caves (1097).
Isa. 66:10-24 Gen. 49:33–50:26 Prov. 31:8-32

Sat. 11 Apr. Fast Day: Wine & oil – LAZARUS SATURDAY. THE RESURRECTION OF THE RIGHTEOUS LAZARUS. Martyr Mark, bishop of Arethusa, Ciril and others (364). Venerable John, Anchorite of Egypt (4th c.). St. Eustathius (Eustace) the Confessor, bishop of Kios in Bithynia(9th c.).
Heb. 12:28–13:8 Jn. 11:1-45

Sun. 12 Apr. Fast Day: Wine & oil – Sixth Sunday of the Great Lent. PALM SUNDAY. THE ENTRY OF THE LORD INTO JERUSALEM. Ven. John(Climacus) of Sinai, author of The Ladder (649). Prophet Joad (10th c. BC ). Holy Apostles Sosthenes, Apollos, Cephas, Caesar, and Epaphroditus, of the Seventy (1st c.). St. Eubula, mother of St. Panteleimon (304). Ven. John the Silent (558). Ven. Zosimas, bishop of Syracuse (662)
Mt. 21:1-11, 15-17 Phil. 4:4-9 Jn. 12:1-18

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CATECHETICAL HOMILY AT THE OPENING OF HOLY AND GREAT LENT

+ BARTHOLOMEW BY GOD’S MERCY ARCHBISHOP OF CONSTANTINOPLE – NEW ROME AND ECUMENICAL PATRIARCH

TO THE PLENITUDE OF THE CHURCH,

MAY THE GRACE AND PEACE OF OUR LORD AND SAVIOR JESUS CHRIST, TOGETHER WITH OUR PRAYER, BLESSING AND FORGIVENESS BE WITH YOU ALL 

We offer hymns of thanks to the God of love as once again we enter Holy and Great Lent, the arena of ascetic struggle, fasting and abstinence, of vigilance and spiritual awareness, of guarding our senses and prayer, of humility and self-knowledge. We are commencing a new and blessed pilgrimage toward Holy Pascha, which has “opened for us the gates of paradise.” In Church and as Church, as we behold the Risen Lord of glory, we all journey together along the way of deification by grace that leads to the heavenly goods “prepared by God for those who love Him” (1 Cor. 2:9).

In the Church, where “the eternal mystery” of divine Economy is realized, all things have their unwavering theological foundation and pure soteriological reference. The incarnation of God and the deification of man are the pillars of the Orthodox faith. We move toward our eternal destination in the love of Christ. Our God, Who is “always for us,” can never be reduced to some “higher power” enclosed in transcendence and the grandeur of almightiness or its holiness. Instead, He is the pre-eternal Word of God, Who “assumed our form” in order to invite humankind to the communion of His holiness, of the genuine freedom. Man, who from the beginning “has been honored with freedom,” is invited to freely accept this divine gift. In the divine-human mystery of salvation, our synergy also functions as a witness in the world of the blessing that we have experienced—“what do you have that you did not receive?” (1 Cor. 4:7)—through the love for the ‘brother.”

Holy and Great Lent is par excellence a period of experiencing this freedom bestowed by Christ. Fasting and ascesis do not comprise a discipline imposed externally, but a voluntary respect of ecclesiastical practice, obedience to Church Tradition that is not a sterile letter but a living and life-giving presence, a permanent expression of the unity, sanctity, catholicity and apostolicity of the Church. The language of theology and hymnography speaks of “joyful sorrow” and “the spring of fasting.” This is because authentic asceticism is always joyful, springful and bright. It knows no dualism or division; it does not undermine life or the world. “Depressive ascesis” that leads to an “aridity of human nature” has nothing to do with the spirit of Orthodoxy, where the ascetic life and spirituality are nurtured by resurrectional joy. In this sense, fasting and ascesis contain an alternative proposal for life before the promised false paradise of eudemonism and nihilistic pessimism.

Another essential element of Orthodox ascetic spirituality is its social character. The God of our faith is “the most social God,” “a God of relations.” It has rightly been said that the Holy Trinity is “the negation of loneliness.” The individualization of salvation and piety, the transformation of ascesis into an individual achievement, overlook the Trinity-centered essence of the ecclesial event. When we fast for ourselves and according to our whim, then fasting does not express the spirit of the Orthodox tradition. Spirituality is the life-giving presence of the Holy Spirit, Which is always “a spirit of communion.” The genuine Orthodox spiritual life always refers to the ecclesial dimension of our existence and not to some “spiritual self-realization.”

In adhering to the dedication of this year by the Holy Great Church of Christ to “the pastoral renewal and due concern for our youth,” we call upon our Orthodox young men and women to participate in the spiritual struggle of Great Lent in order to experience its anthropological depth and liberating spirit, to understand that Orthodox asceticism is a way of freedom and existential fulfilment in the context of the blessed life in the Church, whose core is to “speak the truth in love.” Our Orthodox youth is called to discover the holistic character of fasting, which is praised in the Triodion as “the commencement of spiritual struggles,” as “food for the soul,” as “mother of all good things and all virtues.” It is not simply an abstinence from certain foods, but a struggle against self-love and self-sufficiency, a sensitivity toward our suffering neighbor, and a tangible response of support. It is a Eucharistic use of creation, existential fulfilment, communion of life and solidarity. Ascesis, fasting, prayer and humility convey the fragrance and light of the Resurrection, from which they receive meaning and direction. As the quintessence of ecclesial life and its eschatological orientation, the Resurrection inseparably links the ascetic life with the Divine Eucharist, the sacrament of foretaste of the ineffable joy of the Kingdom of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. The fact that the Divine Eucharist is preserved as the center of the life in the Orthodox Church is associated with the fact that the Resurrection is the foundation of our faith and the bright horizon of our ascetic spirituality as well as of our good witness in the world.

With these thoughts, we humbly invoke upon all of you the mercy and blessing of the God of love, so that we may pursue the race of Holy and Great Lent with devout heart, reach the saving Passion of Christ our God and, glorifying His ineffable forbearance, shine brightly for the feast of His splendid Resurrection that leads us from death to endless life.

Holy and Great Lent 2020

+ BARTHOLOMEW of Constantinople

 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- CORONA VIRUS or COVID-19 THREAT  2 March, 2020

TO:  THE BELOVED CLERGY AND FAITHFUL OF OUR HOLY UKRAINIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH OF THE USA

RE:  THE ONSET OF A NEW VIRUS STRAIN CALLED CORONAVIRUS OR COVID-19

Dear Brothers and Sister in our Lord,

CHRIST IS AMONGST US! HE IS AND ALWAYS SHALL BE!

The words of this traditional greeting and response between Orthodox Christians are a powerful proclamation of our firm belief that the Son of God, the Second Person of the Holy Trinity remains with us at all times and in all places, in particular having received His Most Holy Body and Blood in the Eucharist on a regular basis.  We can be assured of this regardless of anything we face during this earthly pilgrimage, whether it is something that brings us overwhelming joy or something that poses a threat to us, like the deadly virus spreading throughout the world as we type these words.

One faithful member of our Church contacted us recently and the first words out of her mouth were: “Here we go again!”  She was not making light of the real threat that the coronavirus is.  Rather, she is stating a fact that mankind has been faced with horrific plagues and communicable diseases throughout its existence.  She enumerated the likes of the Black plague, the Bubonic plague, the West Nile virus, the BIRD flu, the Ebola virus and the Swine flu among other instances and she expressed her sincere hope that people will not look at this new threat of the coronavirus with a “no big deal” attitude.  We join her in that hope and we urge all of our clergy and faithful to diligently take all measures in their personal and communal lives to protect themselves and others from the spread of this deadly virus.

AS YOUR HIERARCHS, WE DO NOT PRETEND TO HAVE THE ABILITY TO INSTRUCT YOU REGARDING THE NECESSARY PRECAUTIONS YOU ALL SHOULD TAKE IN THE DAYS AND WEEKS AHEAD TO PROTECT YOURSELVES AND YOUR FAMILIES, ALONG WITH THE HUMAN COMMUNITY AS A WHOLE.  FOR SUCH INSTRUCTIONS WE URGE YOU TO GO TO THE OFFICIAL WEBSITE OF THE CENTER FOR DISEASE CONTROL – www.cdc.gov SO THAT YOU CAN EDUCATE YOURSELVES THE STEPS YOU SHOULD TAKE IN YOUR DAILY LIVES.  PLEASE DO NOT HESITATE IN DOING THIS.

With regard to Liturgical Worship in our Churches, we pray that you do not excuse yourselves based on fear from the absolutely necessary common worship – together as the sons and daughters of Christ – to pray along with the Mother of God for His protection during this crisis and to be prepared as parish families in Christ to reach out to the particular agencies in your local area that are providing care and necessities for those who are afflicted with this virus.  We believe that our common prayer, in particular during this Great Lenten season, will offer a profound witness to God about our faith in His Power to eradicate this threat to mankind.

As we gather in our local churches for worship, we believe it might be wise to limit physical contact with the traditional liturgical expressions of faith in reality – our holy Icons – unless provision is made to clean them before and after each veneration – other than just a dry cloth.  During this time of uncertainty, it will be altogether proper to bow or prostrate ourselves before the Icons to express our love for the Lord and the Saints who provide the example for the way we should live our lives. We have always found great spiritual comfort during our visits to the Holy Land and the churches there, when we witnessed faithful Christians venerating Icons and waving from the Icons toward themselves (a “come here” type of wave) seeking to pull the Grace and faithfulness of the Saints being venerated into themselves so that they might emulate them in all their words and deeds.

We feel an urgent need to comment most specifically on the Holy Eucharist – receiving the Holy Body and Blood of Christ our Lord – in Holy Communion.  We must during times like the present, never doubt in the power of the Chalice, dear brothers and sisters.  It contains true LIFE and true LOVE by which no harm could ever enter our lives.  When the common spoon of communion is dipped into the Chalice following the communion of one individual, it is cleansed by the Blood of our Lord beyond our broadest comprehension of what “cleansing” is in human terms.  Throughout all the history of our more than two millennium Church, we can recall no thread of witness or even a shadow of one, indicating that any disease has ever been spread through the Chalice containing the Precious Body and Blood of our Lord.  Perhaps the most convincing fact here is that if the Chalice did, indeed, spread disease, we would certainly be praying regularly for the repose of the souls of tens of thousands or more deacons and priests who, throughout the past 2000 years have consumed the full Chalices following communion of the faithful during hundreds of thousands of Divine Liturgies throughout our history.  This is our faith, dearly beloved, and if we lose that faith, we are in grave danger far beyond the physical danger of a virus.

We have confidence that just as the previous viruses and other threats to mankind have finally been defeated, we will witness the same today.  Let us be exemplary examples of faith and action to one another – not only throughout the duration of the present threat  - but throughout our lives.  We can work miracles by that faith and in the resulting joy, draw others in to Christ’s Vineyard.  You all are in our prayers daily and we ask for yours for ourselves.  St. James states clearly:  “Is anyone among you suffering?  Let him pray.  Is anyone cheerful?  Let him sing Psalms. Is anyone among you sick? Let him call for the elders of the Church, and let them pray over him, anointing him with oil in the Name of the Lord.  AND THE PRAYER OF FAITH WILL SAVE THE SICK, AND THE LORD WILL RAISE HIM UP.” (James 5:13-15)

CHRIST IS, INDEED AMONGST US!  HE IS AND ALWAYS SHALL BE!

+ ANTONY

By the Grace of God, Metropolitan

                           

+ DANIEL

By the Grace of God, Archbishop

 

+ JEREMIAH

By the Grace of God, Archbishop of South American Eparchy