Assumption of the Virgin Mary
Ukrainian Orthodox Church
1301 Newport Avenue, Northampton, PA
Assumption of the Virgin Mary Ukrainian Orthodox Church Online
Father Bazyl
Father Bazyl
Father Bazyl
Metropolitan ANTONY
Metropolitan ANTONY
Metropolitan ANTONY
Protodeacon Mychail
Protodeacon Mychail
Protodeacon Mychail

 Welcome to the Assumption of the Virgin Mary Ukrainian Orthodox Church!

Do you love God and desire a deeper union in Him through Christ?  Are you moved by the beauty of traditional architecture, iconography, and liturgy?  Do you love to experience warm, family-friendly fellowship, to hear good music and Christ-centered preaching, to participate in enriching adult education and to offer the same to your children?  If so, then "Come and See" us!  We are a parish of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the USA under the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople and our doors and hearts are open to you and your family!  Our church follows the Julian (Old) Calendar. All Orthodox Christians are welcome and encouraged to participate in the Blessed Sacraments of Repentance and Eucharist.

We are located at 1301 Newport Avenue in Northampton, Pennsylvania.

NEW! Visit the 360° Virtual Tour of our church by opening the "360 Virtual Tour" page.  It is a fully immersive, sharable virtual reality tour of our church building. Enjoy  a glimpse of the beauty and majesty within our church.

 DAILY LITURGICAL CALENDAR,  SCRIPTURE READINGS AND MENAION

Sunday, 10 (27 Nov.) December Fast Day: Fish
27TH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST. TONE 2
Fore-feast of the Entry of the Most Holy Birth-Giver of God into the Temple.
https://oca.org/readings/daily/2017/12/10
8:30 a.m. Third & Sixth Hours
Holy Mystery of Repentance
9:00 a.m. Divine Liturgy

28th Week after Pentecost

Monday, 11 (28 Nov.) December Sunday, 17 (4th) December Fast Day: Fish
26th Sunday after Pentecost. Tone 3
Martyr Stephen the New of Mt. Auxentius (767)
2 Tin. 2, 20-26 Lk. 19, 37-44

Tuesday, 12 (29 Nov.) December Fast Day: Wine & Oil
Martyr Paramon and 370 Martyrs (274).
Ven. Nectarius the Obedient of the Kyiv Caves (XII cent.).
2 Tim. 3, 16 – 4, 4 Lk. 19, 45-48

Wednesday, 13 (30 Nov.) December Fast Day: Wine & Oil
Holy and All-praised Apostle Andrew the First-called (62).
St. Frumentius, archbishop of Abyssinia (380).
2 Tim. 4, 9-22 Lk. 20, 1-8

Thursday, 14 (1st) December Fast Day: Wine & Oil
Prophet Nahum (VII cent. B.C.). Righteous Philaret the Merciful of Amnia in Asia Minor (792).
Titus 1, 5 – 2, 1 Lk. 20, 9-18

Friday, 15 (2nd) December Fast Day
Prophet Habakkuk (VII cent. B,C,). St. Athanasius, recluse of the
Kyiv Caves (1176). St. Athanasius, recluse of the Kyiv Caves (XIII cent.).
Titus 1, 15 – 2, 10 Lk. 20, 19-26

Saturday, 16 (3rd) December Fast Day: Fish
Prophet Zephaniah (635 B.C.).
Ven. Theodulus, eparch of Constantinople (440)
Eph. 1, 16-23 Lk. 12, 32-40
9:00 a.m. Parastas: +Vladimir Zarayko (Potak family)
5:00 p.m. Great Vespers

Sunday, 17 (4th) December Fast Day: Fish
26th Sunday after Pentecost. Tone 3
https://oca.org/readings/daily/2017/12/17
8:30 a.m. Third & Sixth Hours
Holy Mystery of Repentance
9:00 a.m. Divine Liturgy

Pre-Nativity Fast
We are currently living through the Pre-Nativity Fast – also known as Philip’s Fast because it begins on 15/28 November, the day following the Feast of the Holy Apostle Philip and known in the Western Church as Advent.  This fast continues to the Great Feast of the Nativity of our Lord and God and Savior Jesus Christ – the Incarnation – God becoming one of us for no other reason than to prove the depth of His Love for us.
 
This is a period, which is often not the focus of contemporary Orthodox and non-Orthodox Christians, secularized and smothered in the over-commercialization of the “Xmas” season.  The fast is, according to the Church Fathers, a time of mercy, kindness, compassion, self-examination – a time, which challenges us to personal renewal in the Light of Christ’s Gospel.  It is a sacred season, during which we are called to make a spiritual journey from wherever we are in the world – from the “now” in our parish churches, which we all too often have difficulty seeing beyond – to the City of Bread – Bethlehem and into a cave, the “Holy of Holies”, and to a manger, pre-figuring the Chalice of the Eucharist, in order to bring the gift of ourselves to the Jesus Christ, Who is the Bread of Life.

In ways that we may never fully comprehend, we make this journey like the Magi, like the shepherds.  We each bring our gifts and we dedicate them to Christ.  These are gifts willingly given for the good of others – the gold, frankincense and myrrh of our parenting, teaching, healing, friendship and compassion – in other words, our Love for one another.  
 

We must live through this fast period and each day of our lives in a prayerful attitude of openness to the empowering and unending Presence of the Loving and Living God.  Living an Orthodox Christian life makes heavy demands on us.  But, God gives us His strength.  The Power, the Love and the Grace of God are always with us – in our “community work”, the Liturgy and all other Divine Services, in our private prayer life, in all creation and every single one of His human creatures!  That living Presence makes all things new!  
 
Such an attitude of openness, of awe and wonder and joyful expectancy is what it takes to receive the strength to fulfill our life’s purpose.  Our God is the God of Life and He never stops with a sense of self-satisfaction to say:  “We’ve got it!”  It is always a movement on into the future.  It is always His Presence with us now, doing some new thing. 

We may be in the depths of despair and we may feel ourselves caving in, but that is precisely when He moves in and the Light breaks through and the hope and the power and the healing come.
 
Simply put, our goal during this Pre-Nativity Fast is to mature in Christ, to attain to spiritual quality and excellence in our profession of the Orthodox Christian Faith, to invite Christ Jesus into our very being, to proclaim to an increasingly nominal and apathetic Christian society that, which it would rather not hear:  “I bring you tidings of great joy…a Savior is born…He is Christ the Lord!” and He can be found in the hearts and homes of those who proclaim Him by their willingness to “let our light so shine before men, that they might see our good works and give glory to our Father Who is in Heaven” [Matthew 5:16]. 
 


We call you all, as our spiritual children, to pray fervently during this season for the leaders of the world we live in today.  It is a secularized world full of strife, economic weakness and political instability.  Evil often manifests itself in the cleverest of ways during such times.  Pray for the maturity of those who lead all our nations and most especially those who lead in Ukraine, that their heart’s desire will always be to build a strong nation based on a system of law, peace and justice.  Pray that our Holy Ukrainian Orthodox Church unites and returns to its historical role as the moral conscience of the nation.
 


May He, Who so loved the world that He sent His Only-Begotten Son to be our Lord and Savior, assist us in our resolve to mature and be nourished by the word of Truth and Life-giving mysteries. May we grow and mature in Faith as Ukrainian Orthodox Christians so that others, having witnessed the Faith manifested in our personal lives and in our parish communities, will be drawn to Christ and like the shepherds of Bethlehem, will glorify and praise God for all that they had seen and heard through us.

Assuring you of our prayers and love and requesting yours, we remain your servants in the Lord,
 
+ Yurij
 Metropolitan of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of Canada
 
+ Antony 
Metropolitan of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the USA and Diaspora
 
+ Jeremiah
Archbishop of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, South America Eparchy + Daniel
 Archbishop of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the USA
 
+ Ilarion
 Bishop of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of Canada
 
+ Andrij
 Bishop of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of Canada

 

Statement of the Council of Bishops of the UOC of the USA: Prayers for the Victims in Las Vegas: http://www.uocofusa.org/news_171002_3.html

We find ourselves this day filled with compassion for the families of the victims who perished in the worst massacre of human life in the history of our nation. We find within ourselves this day an insatiable desire to pray for those victims, that our Lord will grant them a place of rest where the Light of His Countenance shines upon them as they await the great and final judgment. And oddly, we find ourselves this day in a state of shock that such a horrific attack can take place once again without any warning, without any obvious reason and without anyone who will really be capable of explaining. We will hear theory after conjecture, after just plain guesswork on the part of pundit after pundit after pundit. We will, however, probably never fully comprehend why such a horror as this Las Vegas attack can happen or how man can be so cruel to man.

We stated “oddly” above about finding ourselves in a state of shock. When we look closely at the history of the world of mankind, not only over the past few decades, but throughout human history, can we discover any extended period of time, beyond a few years perhaps, during which we were not confronted with man’s incredible ability to hurt, dominate, repress or annihilate fellow man? This would be an overwhelming state of affairs had we never been confronted by God Himself, the God of Love, the God Who was and still is ready to sacrifice Himself for the salvation of humanity.

We need this day, dearly beloved brothers and sisters in Christ, to fall down on our knees before that God of Love. We must pray fervently that the Lord will “deliver us from all blindness, forgetfulness, despondency and all hardened insensitivity”… Lord, grant us humility, discernment and obedience. Lord, grant us patience, generosity and meekness. Lord, implant in our hearts the root of goodness and of Your fear… Lord, enable us to love you with all our souls and minds and establish Your will in all…Lord, You know Your creation and as it is Your desire, allow Your will to be done in us, sinners, for You are blessed to the ages. Amen.” (Evening Prayers)

It is by this common prayer on the part of each and every one of us – each and every day or even more than once a day – that the terrorism of this modern age can be crushed. Bigger and better weapons of mass destruction, huge numbers of them, have failed to crush it. The power of faith and trust, however, is beyond and above the power of those man-made weapons. The God of Love, a God Who will not allow us to completely destroy His Creation or ourselves, can and will respond to our prayers – prayers, which we must not consider to be strictly the domain of Orthodox Christians, but those of all mankind. Faith and trust in that God, dearly beloved brothers and sisters, will bring His intervention and healing to a suffering world.

In our Lord’s All-Encompassing Love,

+Antony, Metropolitan

+Daniel, Archbishop

 

Orthoanalytica (Orthodox Podcasts)

http://www.orthoanalytika.org/2017/10/01/20171001-how-to-deny-yourself/

http://orthoanalytika.libsyn.com/webpage/2017/08http://www.orthoanalytika.org/2017/08/21/20170820-orthodox-statement-on-charlottesville/

 




Most Glorious Apostles St. Peter and St. Paul
Among all the Apostles of Christ the most famous and known to us are St. Peter and St. Paul. Their letters, epistles and teachings are treasures for all the centuries. Their words are able to enter the hearts of those seeking God’s Wisdom for they themselves partook of that “living water” and became the “fountains of water”. St. Peter, the fervent follower of Jesus Christ, for the profound confession of His Divinity: “Thou art the Christ, the Son of the Living God,” was deemed worthy by the Savior to hear in answer, “Blessed art thou, Simon ... I tell thee,
that thou art Peter [Petrus], and on this stone [petra] I build My Church” (Mt.16:16-18). On “this stone” [petra], is on that which thou sayest: “Thou art the Christ, the Son of the Living God” it is on this thy confession I build My Church. Wherefore the “thou art Peter”: it is from the “stone” [petra] that Peter [Petrus] is, and not from Peter [Petrus] that the “stone” [petra] is, just as the Christian is from Christ, and not Christ from the Christian. Do you want to know, from what sort of “rock” [petra] the Apostle Peter [Petrus] was named? Hear the Apostle Paul: “Brethren, I do not want ye to be ignorant,” says the Apostle of Christ, “how all our fathers were all under the cloud, and all passed through the sea; and all were baptized unto Moses in the cloud and in the sea; and did all drink the same spiritual drink: for they drank of that spiritual Rock that followed them: and that Rock was Christ” (1 Cor.10: 1-4). Here is the from whence the “Rock” is Peter. To St. Peter Jesus Christ himself entrusted the keys to the Kingdom: “And I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.” (Mt. 16:19) For this reason St. Peter very often depicted in icons with the key or keys. Sometimes he is depicted also with a scroll or book, which means that he wrote letters and that he received instructions from God.To St. Paul our Lord had given sight to see the True Way. Paul was going to capture some Christians thinking he was doing the Will of God. After his spiritual eyes were opened he became number one Christian. His most depicted tool is the sword that symbolizes his teaching with which he overturned the wrong teachings of the Jews and errors of Christians. St. Paul is also depicted with a scroll or book. The Lord did show the Apostle Paul what things he had to suffer for His Name. He instructed him the deeds; He did not stop at the chains, the fetters, the prisons and shipwrecks; He Himself felt for him in his sufferings, He Himself guided him towards this day. On a single day the memory of the sufferings of both these Apostles is celebrated, though they suffered on separate days, but by the spirit and the closeness of their suffering they constitute one. Peter went first, and Paul followed soon after him. Formerly called Saul, and then Paul, having transformed his pride into humility. His very name (Paulus), meaning “small, little, less,” demonstrates this. What is the Apostle Paul after this? Ask him, and he himself gives answer to this: “I am,” says he, “the least of the Apostles... but I have labored more abundantly than all of them: yet not I, but the grace of God, which was with me” (1 Cor.15:9-10).

                                                                             

 

 

 

Sunday of All Saints

On the second Sunday after Pentecost our Holy Ukrainian Orthodox Church celebrates the Sunday of All Saints of Ukraine. Sadly, many of our parishes are witnessing a decline in Sunday worship and in membership. Our parishes are doing everything possible just to keep up with the monthly expenses. Is praying for the bills to be paid the main purpose for the Church? There is another purpose for the church – that purpose is to make people holy. A church that does not make it’s people holy is not a church, it is merely an organization which uses the word 'Church'. The Church celebrates the memory of the holy ones, the saints, to show us living examples of people whose souls were saved, so that we can imitate them in our lives. They teach us how to please God. Today is the Sunday of All Saints of Ukraine and we commemorate all of those men, women and children that are famously known to us and those who are known only to God.

What is a saint? First, we should understand that saints are not born, they are made. We are all born to potentially become saints. The only difference between ourselves who are not saints and the saints, is that they are people who are continually picking themselves up after sinning, continually repenting until they reach holiness, whereas we tend to give up. One type of saint is known as a martyr. The saintly martyrs desired to confess Jesus Christ rather than live, and in doing so, sacrificed everything for Christ. Today, on the Sunday of All Saints of Ukraine, we recognize those who became saints and martyrs in Ukraine and we honor them. At every Divine Liturgy and at Morning Prayers we sing and read the Creed, in which we confess that we believe in the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church. These words which define the Church, One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic, are also words that define the saints.

What exactly does this mean? The saints are One because they are all together and are united – also known as the communion of the saints. The saints are also holy – the word saint means holy. The saints are also Catholic. This word does not mean Roman Catholic – it means 'Catholic' in the original sense of the word. 'Catholic' means the same in all places and at all times. Therefore, on the Sunday of All Saints of Ukraine, we commemorate all the saints of all of Ukraine throughout all the centuries. We commemorate saints of all ages, of all men, women and children, the poor and the rich, the old and the young, the healthy and the sick. They all confessed the same Holy Orthodox Faith. Finally, the saints are Apostolic, for they share in the same Faith and Tradition as the Apostles.

All the Saints of Ukraine that are being remembered today followed the example of Jesus Christ. All of them in their time, in their circumstances of life, fulfilled God’s commandment of love of God and their fellow human being. For many, their times were difficult in Ukraine, maybe more difficult than ours here in the United States. Often their situations in life were more dangerous in spiritual terms, and often in worldly terms were worse than ours. But they still continued, struggled, and reached their reward in Paradise where they now triumph. All we need to do is look at the icons of our church and we will see them: martyrs, confessors, ascetics, fools for Christ, educated people, simple people, rich, poor, bishops, priests, monastics and lay people. This is the Heavenly Church and is all-inclusive. It includes us, the earthly, Militant Church. There is room for each of us there. There is a purpose for us to attend church. Are we being made saintly and holy?

Rev. Fr. Mark Swindle
Holy Virgin Ukrainian Orthodox Church,
Arnold, PA

 

 

 


 

+ B A R T H O L O M E W

By God’s Mercy Archbishop of Constantinople-New Rome

and Ecumenical Patriarch

To the Plenitude of the Church: May the Grace, Peace and Mercy of the Christ Risen in Glory be with you All

Beloved brothers and sisters, children in the risen Lord,

“In the world you shall have tribulation; but be of good cheer, I have overcome the world” (John 16.33) is the reassurance of the Lord, who alone trampled upon death by death, to generations of men and women. “Christ is Risen!” is the cry that we, too, pronounce to all people far and wide from this Sacred See, which has experienced worldly crucifixion and tribulation; but it is also the See of resurrection inasmuch as it is from this corner of the planet, the City of Constantine, that we proclaim “the victory of life” that dispels every form of corruption and death itself.

During his earthly presence, the Lord frequently warned His disciples about the tribulation that would result from his sacrifice on the cross at Golgotha but also because of their ministry and life in this world – both their own as well as all those who believe in Christ. However, he also added a very significant detail: “You will weep and lament, but the world will rejoice; you will be sorrowful, but your sorrow will turn into joy . . . So you have sorrow now, but I will see you again and your hearts will rejoice, and no one will take your joy from you.” (John 16.20-22)

This paschal and spiritual joy was first experienced by the Myrrh-bearing women, who came to the tomb of the life-giving Christ, with the Lord’s greeting in a single word: “Rejoice!” (Matt. 28.9) The same paschal joy is emphatically professed by the Mother Church of Constantinople today: “This is the day of the Lord; let us rejoice and be glad in it.” (Psalm 117.24) The final enemy, death, sorrow, our problems, corruption, tribulation, and trials: all of these are crushed and abolished by the victorious divine-human Lord.

However, we live in a world where the mass media of communication constantly transmit misfortunate news about terrorist attacks, local wars, destructive natural phenomena, problems of religious fanaticism, hunger, the refugee crisis, incurable diseases, poverty, psychological pressure, feelings of insecurity and other similarly undesirable conditions.

In the face of these daily “crosses,” which human beings endure with reluctance, our holy mother Orthodox Church comes to remind us that, as Christians, we can be glad because our leader Christ has proved victorious over them as the bearer of joy, who brings gladness to the whole universe.

Our joy is based on the conviction of Christ’s victory. We are completely assured that good has conquered all things, that Christ came to the world “and left us in order to be victorious.” (Rev. 6.2) The world that we shall eternally inhabit is Christ, who is light, truth, life, joy and peace.

Despite its daily crosses and sorrows, the great Mother Church of Christ exclusively and solely experiences this phenomenon of joy. It experiences – from and within this life – the heavenly kingdom. From this sacred center of Orthodoxy, from the bosom of this martyric Phanar, “on this effulgent night,” we proclaim that the extension and purpose of the cross and all tribulation, the resolution of all human pain and suffering, is the Lord’s reassurance: “I will not leave you as orphans.” (John 14.18-19) “Behold, I am with you all the days of your life, to the end of the ages.” (Matt. 28.20) This is the message that all of us should hear, that the contemporary world should hear in order to surrender to and discern Christ on the road to Emmaus. Indeed, Christ is beside us. And we shall see Him only if we hear and experience His word in our life.

This message – of the victory of life over death, of the triumph of the joyful light of the paschal candle over the darkness of disorder and dissolution – is announced to the whole world from the Ecumenical Patriarchate with the invitation to experience the unwaning light of the resurrection. We invite you all to stand with faith and hope before the risen Christ and before the mystery of life. We invite all of you to trust the risen Lord, the master of joy and delight, who holds the reigns of the entire creation.

Christ is risen, then, brothers and sisters!

May the grace and boundless mercy of the lord of life and master over death be with you all.

Phanar, Holy Pascha 2017

+Bartholomew of Constantinople

Your fervent supplicant to the risen Christ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vigil Lights
Vigil Lights
Vigil Lights
Dc. Mychail Sawarynski
Dc. Mychail Sawarynski
Dc. Mychail Sawarynski
His Eminence Antony
His Eminence Antony
His Eminence Antony
Matters of Interest to our Orthodox Community
 

Theophany of Our Lord 

The Feast of the Theophany of Our Lord is a major feast in Eastern Christianity, with only Pascha (Easter) and Pentecost considered greater on the liturgical calendar. The importance of Christ's baptism is described in the Gospels of apostles Matthew, Mark, Luke and John and is the first manifestation of the Holy Trinity to mankind. Theophany comes from the Greek word "theophania," which means "appearance of God" or "manifestation of God."  The V. Rev. Bazyl Zawierucha, Rector of ASSUMPTION OF THE VIRGIN MARY UKRAINIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH , Northampton, celebrated the feast day Divine Liturgy at 9:00 a.m.  ProtoDeacon Dc. Mychail Sawarynski assisted at the services.  An important part of the feast is the blessing of holy water called "Jordan Water," which signifies Jesus' baptism in the Jordan River. "Our Heavenly Father Himself, with His mighty voice and with the assistance of the Holy Spirit in the form of a dove, said of His only-begotten Son, Jesus Christ, with these words, 'This is my beloved Son in whom I am well pleased.' God said these words while Jesus was standing in the Jordan River. And most of the people who gathered on the banks of the Jordan to hear the sermons of St. John the Baptist heard and observed this unique presentation, thus making this feast the first feast in the Christian church before Christmas was introduced as a separate feast, according to St. John Chrysostom."  At that time, St. John the Baptist referred the people to receive the Son of God. Today the church does it, "Through baptism in the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit, we become the children of God and heirs of the heavenly kingdom. Only Holy Baptism can liberate us from the bondage of Original Sin, and the holy water possesses the power that washes away the evil."  In addition to Jesus' baptism, Theophany traditionally included the Nativity, the wedding feast at Cana, the visit by the Magi and the presentation of Jesus in the Temple as a child, all of which indicate in some way the manifestation of God on Earth.
  Father Bazyl conducted the "Great Blessing of Jordan Water" service near the end of the Divine Liturgy. The large font had been placed before the iconostasis and filled with water for the blessing.
 Three parishioners – John Hnatow Jr, Michael Hnatow, and Nicholas Parchomenko - each held one of three trikiri, which is three candles joined together. Each trikiri was lit and after reading prayers and scripture, Father Bazyl took each trikiri, one at a time, made the sign of the cross with them over the water three times, and then immersed the lighted ends into the water. The extinguished candles were handed back to the candle bearers. After another prayer, Father Bazyl leaned over the font and blew upon the water three times in the form of a cross. He later immersed his hand into the water three times, after which he made the sign of the cross with an ornate cross, held the cross above his head with both hands and then plunged it into the water three times.
When the blessing was completed, Father Bazyl dipped a glass into the water font and then drank three sips of the Jordan Water.  He then walked through the church to bless the congregation with the holy water. As the service ended, the faithful walked to the front of the church, kissed the cross and were anointed with holy oil, and went to the baptismal font with containers to take some blessed water home. In some cases, people drank some water as they left the church, a common tradition, as is getting some of the candle wax floating the font in their containers.


 The Triumph of Orthodoxy!

Read about the triumph of Orthodoxy by Fr. Silouan Rolando HERE.
 
From the Department of Christian Education of the Orthodox Church in America:
 

On Sunday, September 30, we celebrated the 90th anniversary of the founding of our parish and church, and we  greeted in our midst our Spiritual Father and Hierarch, His Eminence The Most Reverend Archbishop, Locum-Tenens and Acting Metropolitan, Ruling Hierarch of the Eastern Eparchy of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the U.S.A., Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople, ANTONY!  See Pictures Tab for photos at our DIvine Liturgy and the Banquet at St Peter and Paul's Fellowship Hall! 

 



Pictures above (CLICK to enlarge pictures):
 

See Pictures Tab for:
1) Children receiving their certificates

2) Pictures from the Paschal Service 2013

4) Photos of the Holy Supper on the Eve of the Nativity in the AVM Church Hall

5) 90th Anniversary Liturgy and Banquet

6) His Emminence Archbishop Antony's Heirarchical Service at our church on 9/25/2011

7) Pre-Sanctified Liturgy photos from 2012

8) Wine Event fund-raiser

9) Miscellaneous pictures


 


From the archives!   Listen to original recordings of The Divine Liturgy of Saint John Chrysostom performed by the Assumption of the Virgin Mary Ukrainian Orthodox Church Choir.  Go to the Tab on the left labeled The Divine Liturgy .